Spiderday (#27)

I know, I know… it’s been too long since the last SPIDERDAY post! The end of term proved busy, but I’m trying to get back on track. So: here are some of the best arachnid-themed stories of the past couple of months. I hope you enjoy all the eight-legged greatness! Let’s start things off with a beautiful photo:

Zora hespera, photo by Sean McCann

Zora hespera, photo by Sean McCann

Jumper_Art

 

A Tangle of Opiliones

The results are in!! Last week I ran a poll to get help in picking the best name for a congregation of Opiliones (i.e., Daddy long-legs, Harvestmenpersons). HUNDREDS of you voted, but the clear winner, with just about 55% of the votes is…

“A Tangle of Opiliones”

Opiliones

A congregation of Opiliones (photo by D. Ringer, reproduced here under CC License 3.0)

This name was proposed by “Antnommer” on Twitter, and it is quite fitting. When thousands of Opiliones hang out together, it does indeed look like a full-on tangle of Arachnids.

Thanks, everyone, for participating in the poll, and helping to find a perfect collective noun for these astounding Arachinds.

Here are the poll results, for those interested:

PollResultsAnd some of the “other” suggestions:

PollResults_Other

Here’s another video to illustrate a rather fine tangle of Opiliones

 

What do you call a congregation of Opiliones? (Poll)

The Arachnid order Opiliones are interesting animals, although vastly understudied. In the English speaking world, they commonly known as Daddy long-legs, Harvestmenpersons, or Shepherd spiders. Opilio, in latin, refers to “shepherd”, and many temperate/northern species have exceedingly long-legs, perhaps in reference to Shepherds on stilts, watching their flocks. The name ‘harvest’ likely refers to the natural history of some species who tend to see higher population numbers in the autumn (‘harvest’ season in the north). Many species are also known to form very dense ‘congregations’, sometimes numbering in the thousands.

Opiliones

A congregation of Opiliones (photo by D. Ringer, reproduced here under CC License 3.0)

I was doing a bit of art on the weekend, and was drawing such a congregation, and this led me to consider what to call a collection of Opiliones. There are great sites out there devoted to Animal Congregations, but none of them had a collective noun for Opiliones (spiders, by the way, are sometimes referred to as a clutter or cluster)

Time to change that. After some Twitter discussions, I present to you a Poll, and I am looking for your votes!

–POLL IS CLOSED—

A congregation of Opiliones.

A congregation of Opiliones.

I’ll leave this Poll open until around the 8 of March – and then write an update! Please share!

…for inspiration, here’s a video for you:

Spiderday (#12)

I’m delighted to bring you the twelfth instalment of SPIDERDAY! All your arachnid links, at your fingertips!

Please note: I’m going to be away (vacation time…) for part of August – your next Spiderday will likely be on 22 August. Hope you can wait that long!

From Jonathan Kolby, an awesome net-casting spider! Amazing animals.

From Jonathan Kolby, an awesome net-casting spider! Amazing animals.

Screen Shot 2015-07-30 at 1.53.58 PM

Spiderday (the eighth)

Hip Hip Hooray! It’s Spiderday! I’ve snared some of the best arachnidy links from this past week. But first… a big hug for you:

A spider hug.

A spider hug.

A spider found for the first time in Canada: Myrmarachne formicaria (photo by V. Levesque-Beaudin, reproduced here with permission)

A jumping spider found for the first time in Canada: Myrmarachne formicaria (photo by V. Levesque-Beaudin, reproduced here with permission)

Expiscor (9 September 2013)

Welcome to Monday… Welcome to Expiscor! Weekly links about entomology, nature, and a dash of the curious. Here’s what I came across this past week:

  • Speaking of Harvestmen, as Derek Hennen points out, this one is like a Christmas tree (adorned with shiny mites)
Get a load of this Harvestman! (photo courtesy or Derek Hennen, reproduced here with permission)

Get a load of this Harvestman! (photo courtesy or Derek Hennen, reproduced here with permission)

  • Beetles drinking wine and so much more: Insect dioramas. Go look. PLEASE go look.
The Spiny Oak Slug (copyright C. Ernst)

The Spiny Oak Slug (copyright C. Ernst)

  • Tweet of the week goes to…Marc Ozon. It’s just so true.

Screen Shot 2013-09-08 at 9.05.34 AM

  • Interesting perspectives on Academia, using the concept of reviewing papers as an example:… should we “give up our archaic notions of unpaid craft labor and insist on professional compensation for our expertise”
  • I was at a Science Communication workshop last week, and was introduced to this:

Expiscor (19 August 2013) – The Photography Edition (Part 2)

Last week was Part 1 of the Photography editions of Expiscor (this is because I was been doing remote field work and have thus been unable to keep up on science links, and now I’m on vacation!).  Here’s Part 2 – and again, I thank the Photographers for letting me post their work here, and for directing me to their favourite nature image.

First up, a lovely shot from Morgan Jackson, a Micropezidae fly (genus Raineria)

Screen Shot 2013-08-04 at 3.16.51 PM

An Expiscor favourite Adrian Thysse submitted this photo, with the following comment: My ‘favourites’ change every week, but here is a shot that was one of themost popular images at the Bug Jamboree at the Ellis Bird Farm last Saturday. It is a meadowhawk, Sympetrum sp. , taken with very shallow depth of field to smooth-out the background and to accentuate those magnificent eyes.

Screen Shot 2013-08-14 at 11.32.26 AM

Next, another awesome fly, from Rachel Graham:

Screen Shot 2013-08-04 at 3.36.47 PM

Warren Sarle submitting this photo – lovely little jumping spiders!

Salticidae

The next photo comes with a story, here’s what Matt Bertone writes about this image:

I was walking on a trail near our local lake (Raleigh, NC, USA), when I came upon a harvestman. I didn’t think much of it until I saw this tiny ceratopogonid sucking hemolymph out of its leg. I had been wanting to find this phenomenon, so I took a couple photos (others show the whole scene) and then was on my way to find new subjects. After posting on facebook and having Chris Borkent comment on it, I sent the photo to Art Borkent, a world expert on punkies. He was amazed at what I had found – Opiliones as a host was only recorded once ever, and only in Brazil. I was kicking myself for not getting the specimen, but at least the shot turned out well!

Screen Shot 2013-08-14 at 1.10.08 AM

Ok, time to move away from the “All Arthropod” show… here’s an image of my own and here’s the story: Last week I was in Cambridge Bay, Nunavut, doing field work. While doing a “tundra walk” one afternoon, we stumbled across a tiny patch of Asters, tucked in among some rocks. It was a beautiful moment because it was very late season, and we observed very few flowers. However, these stunning Asters took my breath away. Delicate, beautiful, fragile.

Screen Shot 2013-08-14 at 1.13.19 AM