Expiscor (11 Nov. 2013): Changes

Expiscor is moving!

It’s been fun bringing you Expiscor each week, but things are changing and this blog feature has found a new home. Starting later this week, I’ll be blogging over at SciLogs.com.

Yes, I’m excited. 

Excited!

Excited!

It is truly an honour and a thrill to be invited to join the cast of impressive science bloggers, from Malcolm Campbell and his “Six Incredible Things Before Breakfast”, to Paige Brown’s “From the Lab Bench” to GrrlScientist’s “Maniraptora” and  Matt Shipman’s Communication Breakdown 

Expiscor will also change its style; I don’t provide nearly as good a “link-fest” as other people do (e.g., Ed’s and Malcolm’s are amazing!) and so instead of a weekly set of links, I will bring what I view as a short-list of fascinating discoveries, mostly from the world of Arthropods. These highlights, to be posted on Monday (as usual), will be more than a list, as I will try to provide a bit of context and opinion around each story. I see opportunity in the blogosphere to highlight new findings, stories, and photos related to the natural history and biology of spiders, insects, and their relatives.  In addition to these weekly highlights, I will write semi-regular long-form posts, again with a focus on arthropods, and some of these will be cross-posted on arthropodecology.com.

Don’t worry, you’ll still see amazing photos on Expiscor, like this one from Nash Turley:

Expiscor is flying away to SciLogs (photo by N. Turley, reproduced here with permission)

Expiscor is flying away to SciLogs (photo by N. Turley, reproduced here with permission)

You might wonder why I have opted to move Expiscor from its current home to a community blog. For me, it’s about continuing to improve and expand the blogging side of my academic life, and working alongside the other bloggers on SciLogs.com, I think, will help further hone my skills. More importantly, however, is that this move will allow me to reach out and connect with a very broad and interdisciplinary audience. Science communication, to me, is all about continually pushing the limits, expanding, thinking about and re-working the ways to bring exciting scientific discoveries to the world, and SciLogs is exactly aligned with this belief, as its mission statement highlights:

The SciLogs combine the strengths of both science culture and the blog medium. They provide scientists and those interested in science with the opportunity to interact in interdisciplinary discussions about science in all its forms… 

ArthropodEcology.com will remain active, although it certainly won’t be as active as it has been over the past year. The original idea behind the arthropod ecology blog was to highlight research activities within my laboratory, and to provide a forum for writing and discussing Higher Education. It’s grown a lot since then, and in some ways, the site will return to its roots, and I hope to get my graduate students and other people within my local community interested in writing their own posts under the arthropod ecology banner.

To my loyal readers, followers and friends: I must thank you for continued interest and support. The community of people associated with this blog is truly tremendous, and you give me energy, ideas and support every day. You help me uncover fascinating stories, provide me with terrific content, including photographs. You have made me a better scientist and a better person.

In sum, I pledge to continue to fish out discoveries and bring them to you; what’s changing is the location, and I do hope you will keep following along over at Expiscor’s new home.

And I know you want it… here’s your tweet of the week, from Minibeast Mayhem. Yeah, invertebrates are awesome.

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Expiscor (4 November 2013): the obscure edition

Last week I had a terrific discussion with a twitter friend, and he suggested that many/most of the links on Expiscor are ones that were VERY frequently discussed over various social media sites – i.e., a re-distribution of commonly viewed stories. Of course, that is part of the objective of Expiscor, but I also want to be a provider of stories people haven’t heard about previously. So, CHALLENGE ACCEPTED! This week my goal is to provide links to things that are so weird, and obscure that you will totally surprised. It’s the obscure edition….  Please take the poll at the end of this post to let me know if I succeeded!

  • Steampunk, clockwork Goliath Beetle.  I want this. Available from BrazenDevice (thanks, Evan, for allowing me to post the photo here. Ento-geeks will love it!)

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  • The Echinoblog...check out this blog description: Echinodermata! Starfish! Sea Urchins! Sea Cucumbers! Stone Lillies! Feather Stars! Blastozoans! Sea Daisies! Marine invertebrates found throughout the world’s oceans with a rich and ancient fossil legacy. Their biology and evolution includes a wide range of crazy and wonderful things. Let me share those things with YOU! ….The question is: How did I ever miss this blog. Awesome.

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  • Tweet of the week goes to Leonard Nimoy (Ok this is NOT at all obscure, but it sure is funny):

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Expiscor (28 October 2013)

Welcome to Expiscor! All sorts of discoveries… at your fingertips.

  • Speaking of images from that workshop, here’s a black widow for you, taken by Alex (thanks for the permission to use your photos here, Alex!)

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  • The latin name discussion came in part from the best hashtag I’ve seen in a while – #ReplaceWordsWithBugs. This also made it difficult to highlight a tweet of the week. Even though there is debate about how to pronounce “…..dae” at the end of family names, this is still a winner, from Adrian Tchaikovsky:

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  • In the spirit of Halloween… BLOODY FINGERS! Yum yum.

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  • Students text a lot during class. In my opinion, this means there’s also a problem with the content and/or instructor. Students need to engage, but Profs must also adapt. Right -so I will have to write  blog post on this (stay tuned)
  • Here’s a Halloween-themed “Simon’s Cat”, featuring a spider:

Expiscor (21 October 2013)

Good Monday morning to all! I’m excited to be attending the Entomological Society of Canada’s annual meeting (you can follow along on twitter using the hashtag #ESCJAM2013).  Hope you have a good week ahead, and to help you start it right, here are some discoveries from the past while.

  • Poor spiders. So much bad press. Time for a lovely photo, perhaps? This one is a lynx spider from Crystal Ernst (Thanks, Crystal, for letting me post it here)

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  • Death of an order. (insect order, that is). An intriguing paper about Termites and their relatives (thanks to students in my introductory Entomology class for pointing out this paper, and the associated controversy)
  • Ever feel like your social calendar looks like this? (from “Wrong Hands“)

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  • To finish… an Icelandic Hymn – in a train station. Wow (thanks Jamin!)

Expiscor (14 October 2013): The Thanksgiving Edition

Today is Thanksgiving Monday in Canada (yes, quite a bit earlier than the US version!). This time of year is my favourite: the cool, crisp air,  fall colours, and the striking sense of decay and change.  It’s also a nice opportunity to eat yummy food and spend time with family and friends.  I’m currently away enjoying this time with my extended family, and therefore decided to bring you a few of my favourite photographs of autumn in my part of the world.

Hiking in a local forest.

Hiking in a local forest.

Pumpkin season!

Pumpkin season!

Some of the local fauna - active on warm fall days!

Some of the local fauna – active on warm fall days!

Early morning at my in-laws place in Ontario (no filter)

Early morning at my in-laws place in Ontario

A country road, 10 minutes from where I live.

A country road, 10 minutes from where I live.

Near my office, at McGill's Macdonald Campus (no filter)

Near my office, at McGill’s Macdonald Campus

Expiscor (7 October 2013)

Another week has passed… here are some discoveries!

  • Speaking of bugshot, here’s one of Nash Turley‘s pics from that adventure (Thanks, Nash, for letting me post it here!)

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  • Students in my intro Entomology class are teaching me a lot (they are lecturing on the Insect Orders). Last week, I learned of Desert Locusts that can swim, underwater. (note: they ‘can’ but they don’t necessarily ‘do’ the swimming.)
  • My students also told me of the hip, cool family of Orthoptera called…. Cooloolidae. Yeah, that’s awesome.
  • You like ants?  What about a jumping spider that looks like an ant? Here you go:
A species of jumping spider in the genus Peckhamia (photo by Alex Wild, reproduced here with permission)

A species of jumping spider in the genus Peckhamia (photo by Alex Wild, reproduced here with permission)

  • Tweet of the week goes to …  Erin McKiernan. This is awesome. Don’t worry: My neighbours think I’m crazy too. I’ve been caught running up and down the street with a sweep net.

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  • On robots: here’s a Wild Cat: This is both terrifying and amazing:

Expiscor (30 September 2013)

Expiscor – your voyage of discovery: bugs, biology and beyond!

Here’s what I stumbled across this week:

  • Ah, Botflies. Gross or cool? For entomologists, this is some pretty amazing stuff.
  • The amazing Ainsley Seago knows how to draw spiders. Here is one of her pieces; perfect for Archnophiles:
A male peacock spider (Maratus amabiis), doing his dance. [by A. Seago, reproduced here with permission]

A male peacock spider (Maratus amabiis), doing his dance. [by A. Seago, reproduced here with permission]

  • Better beetle news: here’s a nice wood-boring beetle, and one that is sexual dimorphic.
  • A lovely image from Sean McCann, showing a moulting Opiliones. (Thanks, Sean, for allowing me to share it here)

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  • To finish, more on the peacock spiders (last week I was teaching about courtship behaviours in arthropods, and that discussion is not complete without viewing this video!):