Spiderday (the eighth)

Hip Hip Hooray! It’s Spiderday! I’ve snared some of the best arachnidy links from this past week. But first… a big hug for you:

A spider hug.

A spider hug.

A spider found for the first time in Canada: Myrmarachne formicaria (photo by V. Levesque-Beaudin, reproduced here with permission)

A jumping spider found for the first time in Canada: Myrmarachne formicaria (photo by V. Levesque-Beaudin, reproduced here with permission)

Spiderday (the sixth)

Here it is… the sixth installment of SPIDERDAY! I scoured the “web”, and found you all the arachnological links from last week:

Opiliones

Not a spider, but an Opiliones (Harvestmen, or Daddy Long Legs). Photo by Nash Turley.

not freckles

Spider book update: Help us pick our species!

We’re writing a spider book! Chris Buddle and Roar will soon present a happy volume packed with eight-legged greatness.

Each chapter will highlight a common species: a plain language and scientific overview of the biology and natural history of common spider species of North America. That’s a big task, because of the hundreds of potential candidate species, we’ll only highlight a dozen or so of the most common.

We need your help: Many of you provided valuable feedback on your favorite spidey friends, and we have already spoken to loads of Arachnologists, but we want to know what’s on everybody’s minds (spiderly speaking). See our chapter candidates and let us know if we missed a North American species SO INCREDIBLE IT MUST BE INCLUDED!

Here are the species we are proposing as “main chapters”:

Argiope aurantia (garden spider, or writing spider)Argiope

Oxyopes salticus (the striped lynx spider)

Oxyopes

Neoscona sp. (orb-weavers)

OrbWeb1OrbWeb2

Misumena vatia (goldenrod crab spider)

Misumena

Dolomedes sp. (fishing or dock spiders)

Dolomedes

Salticus scenicus (zebra jumper)

Zebra

Parasteatoda tepidariorum (American house spider)

HouseSpider

Latrodectus sp. (widow spiders)

Widow

Pardosa sp. (thin-legged wolf spiders)

WolfSpider

Cheiracanthum sp. (ceiling spiders)

CeilingSpider

Agelenopsis sp. (funnel-web spiders)

Agelenopsis

Phidippus audax (bold jumping spider)

Phidippus

Frontinella communis (bowl and doily spider)

Frontinella

Sphodros niger (black purse-web spider)

Sphodrus

And our candidates for sidebars:

Mastophora sp. (bolus spiders)

Scytodes thoracica (spitting spider)

Walckenaeria sp. (money spiders, or micro-sheet web spiders)

Dysdera crocata (wood-louse hunter)

Loxosceles reclusa (brown recluse)

Tetragnatha sp. (long-jawed orb weavers)

Tibellus oblongus

Peckhamia sp. or Synemosyna (ant-mimicking jumping spiders)

Herpyllus ecclesiasticus (Parson’s spider)

Trochosa terricola (wolf spider)

Gasterachantha cancriformis (spiny-backed orb weaver)

Pholcus phalangioides (cellar spider)

 

So… what do you think?

Comment here or email us your thoughts, feelings, or weird spider dreams (only if you really want to)! Your spidersenses are valuable to us!

Thanks!
Yours in spidery greatness,

Chris and Roar

 

/\/\(o00o)/\/\

Spiderday (the fifth)

Here’s your fifth instalment of SPIDERDAY here on the arthropod ecology blog: all the arachnid links from last week:

Pseudoscorpions 'catching a ride' on an insect. Photo by Sean McCann

Pseudoscorpions ‘catching a ride’ on an insect. Photo by Sean McCann

Screen Shot 2015-05-30 at 8.03.37 AM

© C.M. Buddle

Spiderday (the fourth)

Congratulations – you’ve made it through the whole week, and are now ready for SPIDERDAY! Some Arachnological finds from the past week:

First, amazing image of a developing spider:

Yes, they are adorable. (also, Chululu)

Yes, they are adorable. (also, Cthulhu)

A quick sketch of what it looks like when a spider "takes off" by ballooning.

A quick sketch of what it looks like when a spider “takes off” by ballooning.

© C.M. Buddle (2015)

Spiderday (the third)

Hey Hey, it’s SPIDERDAY again! The day of the week in which you can find some links about wonderful Arachnids, from last week. (you can check out past editions here).

Here's a stunning jumping spider: Habronattus americanus (by Sean McCann)

Here’s a stunning jumping spider: Habronattus americanus (by Sean McCann)

Some spidery links:

The other Arachnids:

Ticks: you should watch out for these. Photo by Alex Wild.

Ticks: you should watch out for these. Photo by Alex Wild.

To finish, check out this Tweet: yes, folks, spiders eat spiders.

Screen Shot 2015-05-15 at 7.25.28 AM

Thanks for following along! Keep me apprised of neat Arachnid stories, and I’ll include them in next week’s Spiderday.

© C.M. Buddle (2015)

Spiderday (the second)

Welcome to the second edition of Spiderday! (here’s the first one): a weekly round-up of neat stories about Arachnids.

First up, an amazing shot of fishing spider, from Nash Turley!

A Pisauridae spider, photo by Nash Turley (reproduced here with permission)

A Pisauridae spider, photo by Nash Turley (reproduced here with permission)

Here are some links I stumbled across this week:

KnowledgeGraph_Spiders